Eat well, think well

A new study has found that changes to diet (using the “Modified Mediterranean Diet“) can lead to significant improvement in moderate to severe clinical depression. At the end of a 12 week program, close to a third of participants were classified as being in remission, compared to less than one-tenth of the control group.

You can read the full publication of the research project here:
A randomised controlled trial of dietary improvement for adults with major depression (the ‘SMILES’ trial)

For a plain-language description of the research and findings, follow the link below:
Food & Mood Centre – SMILES Trial.
Healthy fruit

Hungry hungry hippocampus: Diets and your brain

DSC_6903Wanting to eat better, lose weight or improve fitness is one thing … for many of us, actually achieving these goals can prove elusive. Common sense is not always enough to achieve lasting change, and there is such diverse and too often contradictory information out there on health, fitness and dieting.

ABC’s All in the Mind aired a story in late October exploring some lines of research that may shed some light on some of the challenges of dieting – and how we might overcome them.

You can listen to the full program, or read the transcript here: Diet on the Brain

Particularly interesting in this program is reference to some research on how the brain might be “trained” to prefer certain types of food, depending what you typically eat when you are most hungry. More information on that research can be found here:

Train Your Brain to Prefer Healthy Foods

Evidence-based eating – has science been making us fat?

A recent New York Times article, What Really Makes Us Fat, highlights how scientific research may sometimes lead us to wrong conlusions.

In terms of diet and nutrition, as the results of research roll in, science is beginning to agree that the food behaviours humans had for thousands of years (higher fat & protein, lower carbohydrates) were better than the typical high carbohydrate (and fructose!) diets of the last 50 years – contradicting some of the advice that had come from earlier research.

Continue reading