Word perfect

The internet can be quiet a mind field because often what you read is unaccurate. Its partly because people rope learn facts or phrases without checking there source or based on what they have miss-heard. Its probably a good idea to be weary of facts that are presented without sighting reliable sources. If you’re curiosity is peaked by some new theory, do some background checking. Weather you learned a fact twenty years ago or yesterday is a mute point: it could turn out to be wrong. Maybe you could care less, but if you like to be accurate you could wet your appetite with a review of Wikipedias useful List of common misconceptions.

How many mistakes can you find in the text? 10 is average, above 14 is excellent.

This was a post put up yesterday on our Thrive Wellness facebook page. In case you’re looking for the answer, I thought it was between 16 and 18 depending on opinion on a couple of things (for example, “unaccurate” does appear in some dictionaries, and has a history of appearing in some literature but is generally considered a mispelling).

Here is corrected text with 17 changes. I’m sure someone out there can identify more corrections that should be made:

The Internet can be quite a mine-field because often what you read is inaccurate. It’s partly because people rote learn “facts” or phrases without checking their source or based on what they have misheard. It’s probably a good idea to be wary of facts that are presented without citing reliable sources. If your curiosity is piqued by some new theory, do some background checking. Whether you learned a “fact” twenty years ago or yesterday is a moot point: it could turn out to be wrong. Maybe you couldn’t care less, but if you like to be accurate you could whet your appetite with a review of Wikipedia’s useful “List of common misconceptions”.

Now, if reading all those mistakes was an emotionally intense experience for you, bringing up memories of countless infuriating times of reading or hearing something wrong, perhaps you might like to head over and read It Has to be Perfect and The Unrelenting Society.

About Paul McQueen

Dr Paul McQueen is a Clinical Psychologist, holding a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Melbourne. He has experience working in both adult and child mental health services in Queensland and Victoria. Dr McQueen is comitted to providing high quality, evidence-based interventions for a range of mental health conditions. He specialises in the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and Depression.

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